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  • Give Sunscreen a Boost with Plant Oleosomes!

    The plant kingdom once again provides cosmetic chemists with a new technology that plays an important role in sunscreen formulations. Known as oleosomes, these oil capsules are found naturally in various plants and seeds, providing a reservoir for plant oils that provide an energy source for the plant. Cosmetic scientists have learned that these spherical structures can be loaded with active substances such as sunscreens, providing both a means of delivery, as well as, a stabilized environment for actives that may break down under normal conditions. Oleosomes represent the next generation in encapsulation.

    They also act as natural emulsifying agents, allowing us to reduce the amount of emulsifier used in a formula. Why is this important? Because we now know that emulsifying agents can interfere with chemical sunscreen activity, especially when higher SPFs are used. When oleosomes loaded with active sunscreens are added to a formula, less of the regular emulsifying agents are required. The end result is that we get a boost to SPF activity with a lower concentration of sunscreen actives and emulsifiers. This is a real bonus, especially for individuals that may find higher concentrations of chemical sunscreens potentially irritating. When applied to the skin, oleosomes collapse in a timed-release fashion, delivering the sunscreen protection over a period of time. Not since the development of UV Smart Booster technology, which delivered antioxidant capsules to provide enhanced sunscreen protection, has there been such exciting new technology that promises to change the development of sunscreen products.

    1 Comment

    • Melanie Arima Says:

      Which sunscreens are useing this new technology of Oleosomes? I usually have a reaction with most sunscreens around my eyes. The sunscreen that dosen’t make my eyes burn is Bullfrog, which is thick and heavy stuff. I am always looking for something new but refuse to be adventurous because of the cost.

      April 17, 2012 at 4:00 pm

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