News

  • Teaching Through Touch: The Do-It-Yourself Face Massage in 4 Easy Steps

    DewySkinDIYTOUCH is powerful. As professional skin therapists, we have a special privilege of using the power of touch through massage. Touch techniques are no secret in our profession, yet there are many people that have yet to experience the transformative power that a skilled face massage can deliver.

    Our clients rely on our hands as their main point of reference, and with our guidance they can learn to apply movements on certain facial points as part of their homecare routine. But not all face massages are created equal. There are controversial “face yoga” or alternative facial exercises that claim to tighten and lift, which, if not done properly, may lead to skin stretching or wrinkle formation. This is where our expertise comes in to educate our clients.

    The human face itself has over 40 muscles! Many of these are responsible for facial expression and are often tender at times of stress or fatigue; and as we age, the strength and tone of these muscles will slacken. Face massage movements can be effective at firming and toning areas of the face and neck.

    Acupressure works great on face muscles by using the fingers to press key points on the surface of the skin to help relieve headaches, eye strain, sinus problems, neck pain and many other ailments. The healing touch of acupressure reduces tension, increases circulation and enables the client to relax deeply. Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD) stimulates the movement of the lymphatic fluids in order to detoxify the body with gentle, rhythmical technique for enhanced activity of the immune system and to assist with pain reduction.

    At The International Dermal Institute, we looked at these techniques and created a relaxing, rejuvenating do-it-yourself face massage that incorporates these acupressure and drainage techniques to boost circulation and detoxification, smooth fine lines and alleviate muscle tension. This DIY massage works best when used in conjunction with a therapeutic oil, such as Dermalogica’s Phyto Replenish Oil, which harnesses the power of phytoactive ingredients like Camellia Japonica Seed Oil, Tamanu Oil, Orchid Flower Extract and Chia Seed Oil. The end result? Radiant, energized, healthy, dewy skin.

    Share these steps with your clients to try at home and how they benefit the skin.

    • EASE FOREHEAD CREASES: Place fingertips together in the middle of the forehead and, with elbows out, press firmly. Glide (fingers together!) with slight pressure toward temples, press and release. Relaxes tension held in the forehead. Repeat 3 times.

    • DE-PUFF EYES: Especially great after a long flight, or a long night! Using your index or middle finger, press between brows—the power spot we think of as the “Third Eye”—and stroke over brows, around the eyes, and returning to center. Then use your fingertips to trace an “S” shape between the brows to release tension. Alternate between presses and S’s, repeat 3 times each, for a total of 6 movements.

    • SINUS RELIEF: Use your index or middle finger beside each nostril, press, release and slide to the divot or small hollow just under the cheekbone, and press gently. Glide toward ear (each side) and lightly press in the hollow right beside the ear. A bit of tenderness is normal as circulation boosts and detoxification takes place. Repeat 3 times.

    • JAW RELAXER: Are you a clencher? Many people actually damage their teeth by grinding or simply clenching, throughout the day and all night along! This can result in massive headache as well as cracked fillings. With flat fingers, beginning in center of chin, move fingers in small circles upward along the jawline. Stop just below the ear, gently press, and lightly move fingers down the neck to help with lymphatic drainage—open your fingers toward the collarbone as you go. Repeat 3 times.

    Watch this video to see the massage in action!

    Teach your client these moves on their next visit along with a sample of a botanical-based phyto-replenishing oil to magnify the power of touch. You’ll give their skin a wake-up call that will look and feel fresher, and function better.

  • The Lowdown On Lipids: Part 2 – Replenishing the Barrier with Exotic Plant Oils

    Chia Seeds and Camellia JaponicaThe use of plant oils in skin care has been around for decades, however, in the past few years our understanding of how these phytochemicals (AKA plant chemicals) affect our skin has been enhanced by numerous research studies. As a scientist with a PhD in plant biochemistry and a passion for the skin care industry, I am forever searching the globe for new exciting plant actives that can be used to treat the skin.

    Now that we know the causes that can lead to loss of lipids from The Lowdown On Lipids: Part 1 – Why Does the Skin Need Them, we can address many of these signs with scientific expertise provided by nature in the form of phytochemicals. As you might expect, I have a few new favorite oils that we have been studying at The International Dermal Institute that have the ability to replenish the skin’s natural barrier lipids for optimized skin health.

    Let’s take a closer look at these oils and how they may be used to treat the skin.

    Camellia Japonica Oil

    Camellia japonica is often called the “Rose of Winter” and is a member of the tea family. It is a small flowering tree native to Korea and Japan. It is one of the native plants grown on Jeju Island famous for its unpolluted, clean environment. Closer examination of this oil reveals it is a rich source of critical membrane lipids or fatty acids including oleic, linoleic and palmitic acids. In laboratory studies it provided twice as much antioxidant protection than Vitamin E, Grapeseed Oil, and/or Rosehip Oil. Studies using human fibroblast cells demonstrated an increase in collagen synthesis when treated with a low concentration of the oil (0.001); as the concentration of oil applied increased (up to 0.1%) so did the stimulation to collagen synthesis. Most importantly, studies on human subjects using a 2% Camellia Japonica Oil topically applied to the face showed a reduction in wrinkles as measured by laboratory instruments and observations by trained clinical technicians and patients.2

    Camellia Japonica Oil also inhibited pro-inflammatory mediators3 and was more soothing than Bisabolol in erythema induced tests. Likewise, it provided lipid barrier properties that showed an inhibition in TEWL, helping to maintain skin hydration levels.

    Overall, this esthetically pleasing, lightweight plant oil soothes irritated/sensitized skin, maintains hydration levels by reducing trans epidermal water loss (TEWL) and helps stimulate collagen production to fight aging skin.1,2

    Chia Seed Oil

    In addition to Camellia Japonica Oil, the seed oil derived from the plant Salvia hispanica, otherwise known as Chia, has proven to be a new addition to the arsenal of active plant oils available to the cosmetic formulator. Chia Seed Oil is rich in antioxidants that help quench free radicals and omega-3-fatty acids that have been shown to help reduce inflammation.

    Salvia hispanica is a member of the mint family that is often used as a food supplement for energy—and was once known as the Mayan running food. It is grown primarily for its seeds that contain from 25% to 40% oil that are rich in omega-3 linolenic acid and omega-6 linoleic acids. Both essential fatty acids are required by the human body for good health, and cannot be artificially synthesized.

    Researchers in Korea reported that a topical application of a cream containing Chia Seed Oil for 8 weeks led to significant improvements in skin moisture, skin thickening and crusty lumps in patients with pruritis caused by end-stage kidney disease and also in healthy patients with xerotic pruritis.4 Pruritis is an unpleasant skin sensation that produces a strong urge to scratch, and it is a characteristic symptom of some systemic diseases such as advanced kidney disease. Xerotic pruritis is a form of the condition that includes redness, dry scaling and cracks in the skin.

    Tamanu Oil

    Lastly we have Tamanu Oil, extracted from Calophyllum inophyllum seeds from the Ati tree of the South Pacific. Traditionally Tamanu Oil has been used to combat a range of skin problems and is highly beneficial as an antioxidant, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory agent. The oil contains unique calophylloids that reduce stinging in skin and helps to control the growth of the acne causing bacterium, P. acnes.

    French researchers working with leprosy patients were the first to study the skin regenerating properties of Tamanu Oil. It has been used to heal stubborn and severe wounds with very good success. More specifically, scientists have identified the xanthone compounds in Tamanu Oil that have been credited for its anti-inflammatory activity and ability to reduce swelling and irritation with topical application.

    From a study conducted in 2002, participants applied a product containing Tamanu Oil to aged scars twice daily for nine weeks and saw improvement, so even older scars can benefit from Tamanu Oil regenerative properties.5

    Tamanu Oil is also excellent for individuals with acneic skin, as the mild antibacterial properties of the oil work consistently and without irritation to minimize growth of acne causing bacteria on the skin. The moderate antimicrobial activity of Tamanu Oil has been compared to antibiotics like amoxicillin. The actives, canophyllol and canophyllic acid, have been identified as the specific agents in the oil that provide the antibacterial activity.

    And finally, the xanthones and coumarins found in Tamanu Oil are potent antioxidants that inhibit the breakdown of cell membranes from free radicals. Consequently, this oil can help to counteract aging caused by UV-induced free radicals.

    Harnessing the power of phytoactive ingredients is one of the best ways to restore a compromised skin barrier to replace intercellular lipids that have been depleted from aging, environment, and the many other factors. And with the overwhelming amount of research on these oils and their phytochemical components they are prime candidates for incorporation into your favorite skin care products.

    Reference:

    1. Akihisa T, et al. Chem. And Pharm. Bull. Tokyo 45:1023-2016.

    2. E. Jung et al. Effect of Camellia japonica oil on human type I collagen production and skin barrier function. J. Ethnopharmacology 112 (2007) 127-131.

    3. S. Kim et al. Anti-inflammatory activity of Camellia japonica Oil. BMB Reports 2012: 177-182)

    4. Se Kyoo Jeong, et al. Effectiveness of Topical Chia Seed Oil on Pruritus of End-stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Patients and Healthy Volunteers. Ann Dermatol. 2010 May; 22(2): 143–148.

    5. A. C. Dweck and T. Meadows. Tamanu (Calophyllum inophyllum) – the African, Asian, Polynesian and Pacific Panacea. International Journal of Cosmetic Science. Volume 24, Issue 6, pages 341–348, December 2002

  • The Lowdown On Lipids: Part 1 – Why Does the Skin Need Them?

    Phyto Replenish Oil Puddle

    Lipids, or natural protective oils, are essential for maintaining the integrity of all living matter due to their ability to form a barrier between the living cell and the outside world. In human skin, lipids are used as building blocks for membranes and fulfill specific functions such as preventing desiccation (a state of extreme dryness) by forming a barrier and preventing evaporation of water.

    More specifically, the outermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum (SC), constitutes the main barrier to the movement of substances into and out of the skin; it consists of corneocytes (SC cells) and several different types of lipids, such as ceramides, sterols and free fatty acids. These lipids that make up the barrier lipid layer of the stratum corneum are expelled from cells during the process of keratinization in the epidermis. When the barrier lipid layer is disturbed, this can lead to pathological diseases such as ichthyosis, psoriasis or atopic dermatitis.

    Aging also has an effect on the composition of SC lipids. Studies have shown a decline in ceramide and sterol components with an increase in fatty acid composition in aged skin.1

    Seasonal changes have also been shown to impact SC barrier lipids which leads to dryness, roughness and increased trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) while a reduction in ceramides generally leads to an increase in skin sensitivity and irritability2. Likewise, diet and the products we apply to our skin can impact the barrier lipids. Alcohol, acetone, harsh surfactants, AHAs, BHAs and retinoids can strip lipids giving that taut skin feeling which is often associated with increased dehydration, wrinkles, sensitivity and premature aging.

    Unfortunately, nothing good results from having a compromised lipid barrier layer. Therefore, the challenge to the cosmetic formulator is to create an esthetically appealing formula that helps replenish those critical lipids to the epidermis. The most important property of lipids in skin care is their ability to restore the barrier lipid, promote moisturization, smooth skin texture as well as, a visual reduction of the signs of dryness. Restoring the barrier lipids not only inhibits TEWL, it helps keep the natural moisturizing factor (NMF) inside the cells where it is needed to keep cells hydrated and enzymes functioning normally.

    Fortunately, when we are young our skin can restore its natural barrier lipids after an insult such as exposure to alcohol, soap or chemical peels. The time required for barrier lipid recovery varies according to age; in young individuals 50-60% of the barrier lipids are restored within 12 hours with full recovery taking about three days. However, in older adults complete recovery can take over a week. Depending on the condition of the skin this can lead to dehydration and additional sensitization.

    The most obvious possibility for recovering the skin barrier function is by replacing the intercellular lipids in between our keratinocyte cells. Studies measuring TEWL as an indicator of barrier integrity have demonstrated that the barrier function can be restored with the application of skin type lipids.

    Understanding the science and the physiological processes behind the barrier lipids of the SC as well as how we can optimize their functionality is something we have studied extensively at The International Dermal Institute; we have looked at the effects of adding various plant or phytolipid complexes to the skin in order to optimize hydration, reduce sensitivity and enhance the health of the skin.

    Read Part 2 of this blog series to learn about the latest plant oil ingredients, also called phytochemicals, that help to restore the natural barrier function of the skin.

    References:

    1. Lipids in Skin Care Formulations p 279 in Cosmetic Lipids and the Skin Barrier. ed T. Forster, Marcel Dekker. 2002

    2. DiNardo et al. Contact Derm. 1996; 35:86-91

  • Using Skin Microbes to Lighten Pigmentation

    DH Diglucosyl Gallic Acid conversion

    Whether you like it or not, the human body is inundated with millions of microorganisms that live in a mutualistic relationship with us—in other words, each species benefits from the activity of the other. Many of the bacteria that cohabitate with us humans are not harmful and actually serve a purpose. Take for example the bacteria that live in our gut; these microbes help us digest and process our food. If something happens to our natural gut microflora, such as often occurs after a course of antibiotics that kill good and bad bacteria, our digestive system can be thrown off. We might supplement our diet with probiotics to help restore balance to our gut. Like our gut, our skin is also home to billions of microorganisms often referred to as the skin microbiota.

    The skin microbiota is continuously communicating with our epidermal cells, generating metabolites and stimulating physiological processes. Recent studies have demonstrated that the skin’s microbiota can activate specific cosmetic compounds converting them into biologically active molecules on the skin’s surface. Diglucosyl Gallic Acid, also known as Trihydroxy Benzoic Acid alpha-Glucoside (THBG) is an example of a patented molecule that when topically applied to the skin is partially converted into another form, Trihydroxy Benzoic Acid (THBA) by the skin’s microflora. THBG and THBA work together to lighten skin pigmentation and even out skin tone. Together, these two molecules not only inhibit free radical formation, which could result in hyperpigmentation, but more importantly they help stop melanogenesis. Both THBA and THBG molecules are effective at reducing pigmentation spots, as well as helping to control formation of new spots.

    As scientists continue to study the skin’s natural microbiota, it is quite apparent that studies will no longer just focus on the relationship of microbes to skin disorders and disease but will now venture into a new realm; we have just scratched the surface of understanding how our skin’s natural microbial populations can be used in conjunction with topically applied molecules to address specific skin conditions.

  • Education Resources for Former Marinello School Students

    Shortened IDI Gray writingDear Undergraduate Students:

    We were dismayed to learn about the closure of Marinello Schools of Beauty and the impact this may have on your education plan. The International Dermal Institute is committed to your education at every level and we would like to provide you some resources so that you can continue on your journey in skin therapy and/or cosmetology.

    •  First and foremost, you may contact our education staff at any time if you need assistance finding an alternative school in your area. Visit this link for ways to contact us: http://dermalinstitute.com/us/contact/email_us.html

    •  For any questions about financial assistance, please visit this link: https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/about/announcements/marinello

    •  If know someone whose employment has been affected by the closure of these schools, recommend our free Job Board to find opportunities in your area: http://dermalinstitute.com/us/jobboard/index.html

    Your success in the industry is important to us and we are here to support you during this transition.

    From all of us at The International Dermal Institute, we wish you the best of luck.

  • Shining the Light on LED

    Derm_Headshot28775BB-e1422475470394-150x150For some, using Light Emitting Diodes (LED) to treat certain skin issues like acne and aging may sound too good to be true. How is it that shining a light on your client’s face will clear up those pesky breakouts and plump up their skin? Well, the science is in the stars. About 40 years ago, scientists at NASA discovered through plant growth experiments that light therapy was a beneficial way to repair damaged cells and speed up the healing process.

    Through the years the basis for this technology has been accepted as a non-invasive popular application to treat a variety of common skin conditions. LED photomodulation works similar to the way photosynthesis works in plants as it triggers the body to convert the light energy into cell energy. The light encourages natural cellular activity and “re-energizes” the cells in the skin.

    While the visible spectrum of light can be represented in many LED devices, we are focusing on the most researched and effective light waves: Red and Blue.

    Red LEDRed for Wrinkles

    Red light therapy, is a technology that uses visible red light wavelengths from 630-660 nanometers and infrared light wavelengths at around 880nm to penetrate deep into the layers of the skin. Red and Infrared light increases energy inside cells and jump-starts the production of collagen and elastin to help make skin firm and supple. Because the layers of the skin have a high content of blood and water, it makes it easy for the skin to absorb light. Most researchers agree that light therapy increases production of Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP)—the energy or battery life of cells—and it may also work by targeting water layers on elastin, gradually restoring its elastic function reducing the appearance of facial wrinkles. In addition, Red Infrared light therapy also assists with blood circulation, which effectively transports oxygen and nutrients to the skin. Along with fighting wrinkles, red light therapy has been used in skin healing for rosacea and even eczema.

    Blue LEDBlue for Blemishes

    Blue light has a wavelength of 400–490 nm and has special effects on the skin especially when it comes to treating acne. When blue light reaches the sebaceous glands in the skin, it can help excite porphyrins, which are compounds inside acne bacteria (Propionibacterium acnes). When porphyrins are activated, they release reactive oxygen molecules that damage the bacteria internally, basically killing the bacteria from the inside out. Since red light helps accelerate wound repair, it’s often used in combination with blue light to treat acne, encourage healing, and lessen acne scarring and under the skin lesions.

    These two light wavelengths can effectively and gently make significant changes in the skin at a deep level by repairing cells, stimulating collagen and elastin and helping to treat acne. By incorporating these light therapies you can add another level of expertise to your skin treatments and energize your services.

    Keep in mind before shining that light—manufacturers of LED devices must gain FDA clearance in order to make certain claims about their devices. It’s always good to check on the company’s status and proven results before purchasing so you can ensure your client’s treatment is on track for optimal skin health.

    To see LED in action, watch the IDI webisode Using Machines to Power up Your Treatments-Part 2.

  • Join the Multi-Masking Movement

    Charmaine CooperThere are many trends that have helped to shape the canvas of the skin care and cosmetics industry; many of which reflect the way consumers have evolved over the generations in their perception of skin care. But no one can argue that the generation of consumers today depict the most education-hungry and -accessible consumers of our time.

    One trend that we find taking quite a lead among consumers now is “multi-masking”. But is this really a trend or more of a movement? In the past, the landscape of skin care masques have always been mysterious to consumers. Until now. Consumers have moved from the lack of comprehension of masks to a clearer understanding.

    multi mask imageThis could not have been achieved without the support of professional skin therapists worldwide. For years, skin therapists have understood that one size never fits all! In fact, there are no two skins alike. Skin conditions constantly change. And with these constant changes that the average person goes through, as a result of the weather, diet, hormones, lifestyle choices and stress, multi-masking just makes sense. Masking still is, today, the quickest way to achieve visible results in the skin’s tone, oil presence, hydration/radiance levels and inflammatory levels.

    Often at times, all of these concerns can show up at once! And if one size does not fit all, multi-masking can support in a brilliant way. Any of these concerns can be addressed in just 7-10 minutes with masks – day or night, just a few times a week. The key to making the most of multi-masking is to not combine the ingredients in one area or zone – but to multi-mask the face zone by zone as the conditions dictate.

    Here are some recommendations you can give to your clients:

    For oily skin, recommend a clay based mask to absorb excess oil. This is a concern, commonly found in the T-zone of the face. Oil balancing ingredients include Activated Charcoal, as well as Bentonite and Kaolin clays.

    For dehydrated, dull or sensitive skin, a hydrating and calming mask will calm and lock in moisture levels. These concerns can be prevalent in the cheek areas, and may sometimes involve the neck and chest. Look for ingredients such as Cross-linked Hyaluronic Acid, Aloe Vera, Chamomile and Avena Sativa (Oat) that are extremely beneficial for optimal moisturization and turn down redness levels.

    For lackluster, hyperpigmented or dull skin, vitamins are a must. This is a common concern in the chest, possibly cheeks and forehead area. Vitamin A, C and E along with key amino acids help to recover the skin’s health and vitality, revealing a brighter and more radiant skin.

    Having a comprehensive understanding of these common issues and simple approach with multi-masking will position you as the go-to skin therapist to remedy many concerns at once. Because great skin always begins with great education.

    So, go ahead and tell your clients to join the multi-masking movement. It’s well overdue!

  • Black Magic: The Key Benefit of Activated Charcoal

    Dr. Diana HowardOver the past few years numerous products have been introduced into both the skin care and health care markets that feature activated charcoal as a main ingredient. As the Vice President of Research and Development at The International Dermal Institute I am often asked, is this just a fad or is there any real science behind this trend? In order to answer this question I need to explain exactly what activated charcoal is and how it works in these types of products.

    Let’s start with the obvious question…What is charcoal? Charcoal may be derived from peat, coal, wood, coconut shells, or petroleum that is burned to form a lightweight mass of carbonaceous charcoal. When we refer to “activated” charcoal it means the charcoal has been reheated, often to extremely high temperatures, which creates thousands of micropores that increase the surface area of the charcoal.

    Adsorption Power

    The activated charcoal, with its increased surface area, can readily adsorb substances onto its surface. This differs from absorption where one substance is incorporated into another; think about a sponge absorbing water—the sponge becomes saturated with the water through and through. In adsorption, molecules adhere just to the surface of the activated charcoal. Suppliers of activated charcoal use special manufacturing techniques that yield highly porous activated charcoals with varying surface areas; it is not uncommon to find that one teaspoon of activated charcoal can have a surface area of as much as 10,000 square feet. That’s a lot of adsorption power!

    While the skin care industry has just seen the merits of activated charcoal, the medical community has known about the adsorption power of charcoal for years. Entire books have been written on the subject of the medical uses of activated charcoal to adsorb toxins or poisons in humans and animals. As a matter of fact, even the Red Colobus monkeys of Zanzibar have learned about the health benefits of using activated charcoal.

    I learned firsthand about the power of charcoal when one of my dogs ate something poisonous and the vet pumped her stomach with activated charcoal to adsorb the toxins; fortunately the activated charcoal along with the adsorbed toxins are readily eliminated through the dogs digestive system. In a similar fashion activated charcoal filters are used to adsorb odorous or colored substances from gases or liquids; a common household example is charcoal water filter often found in refrigerators and freezer ice makers. Bear in mind that once all of the sites on the activated charcoal are filled it’s time to replace your filter.

    Activated Charcoal in Skin Care

    In the skin care industry, cosmetic chemists have found that activated charcoal can readily adsorb oils, toxins and impurities from the skins surface. One of the most effective forms of activated charcoal is Binchotan charcoal derived from Ubame Oak trees from the Kishu region of Japan. Binchotan charcoal is activated by burning oak branches at extremely high temperatures for several days and then rapidly cooling them. It is known as the highest quality activated charcoal and is often used to purify drinking water. Because it is such a clean, odorless charcoal it is also used in high end Japanese restaurants that use charcoal fires in tableside dining.

    In skin care formulations, activated Binchotan charcoal adsorbs oils as well as pollutants and other superficial toxins from the skin’s surface. We know that masques can deliver dramatic benefits to the skin and charcoal masques have gained popularity among consumers, especially those with oily and breakout-prone skin. Combined with other actives, such as keratolytic sulfur, mineral rich volcanic ash, and exfoliating AHAs, one can optimize the results of using a charcoal masque for a wide range of skin care conditions. Rinsing this charcoal formulation from the skin readily removes the adsorbed substances from the skin to help purify, brighten and revitalize any skin condition.

  • Top 3 Post-Grad Courses Every Skin Therapist Should Take

    Tara - tempOur industry has evolved from the idea of applied beauty to in-depth knowledge of skin, and there are several trends in continuing education that exhibit these changes. We have noticed an abundance of post graduate workshops and seminars that promise profitability, but will they truly deliver? Let’s take a look at three hot skin care classes that can elevate your skill set as a professional skin therapist that will wow your clients, and maybe even a future employer.

    Medical Skin Care

    The medical field is utilizing skin therapists evermore to help improve the health of a patient’s skin pre and post-surgery. Skin treatments are usually offered as part of a package combined with medical procedures; thus making a huge opportunity to grow our skill set and become profitable when working hand in hand with doctors. Sign up for a class that discusses common MediSpa procedures such as injectables, lasers and skin needling and how to navigate the MediSpa environment.

    DERM_IDI_Modalities_31521Advanced Exfoliation

    Are you properly prepared to offer state-of-the-art treatments like hydro-dermabrasion, ultrasound and/or chemical peels? Just because we can use these tools doesn’t mean we understand their full potential. For that reason, education will allow us to learn how to get the most out of our treatments. Take a class that shows you how to apply these advanced exfoliation techniques and how they can be used alone or other with products. Incorporating these advances in exfoliation can help you give express treatments that yield immediate results!

    Oncology Skin Care

    Cancer has long been considered a contraindication for professional treatment—that is until now! It all starts with one question: Do you have any compromised lymph nodes? This question opens up a conversation with a client to let us know how to proceed with the proper modifications. Learn about oncology skin care to understand proper modifications for massage, products to avoid, and how to safely care for an oncology patient. Not only are you performing a beneficial service, but also growing your business at the same time.

    Don’t know where to start? Take a look at IDI’s class offerings (USA) and lectures such as: Medical Skin Care: What Therapists Need To Know; Acids, Peels, and Exfoliants; and Cancer Aware: Client Safety and Lymphedema. No matter where you work or the treatments you offer, it is always important to stay CONNECTED!

  • Follow Your SKINtuition with Annet King

    IDI bug blog

    Are you’re looking for a little push in the right direction in your career, and don’t know where to start? Leave it to our director of global education Annet King to get you moving onward and upward!

    All you have to do is read her monthly column SKINtuition, as seen in Skin Inc. Magazine, to learn expert tips and business advice for all professionals in skin therapy.

    So regardless if you’re a skin care pro out on your own or the proud owner of a skin center, take a moment to check out the latest entries to help take your career and your business to the next level of success.

    annet cropped

    Eat That Procrastination Frog for Better Business

    Sleep Deprivation and Skin

    3 Tools of the Trade Every Skin Pro Needs

    5 Ways to Beat Client Boredom

    Merchandising Secrets You Need to Know (BTW, they can boost retail by 35%)

    Culture or Vulture