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  • Join the Multi-Masking Movement

    Charmaine CooperThere are many trends that have helped to shape the canvas of the skin care and cosmetics industry; many of which reflect the way consumers have evolved over the generations in their perception of skin care. But no one can argue that the generation of consumers today depict the most education-hungry and -accessible consumers of our time.

    One trend that we find taking quite a lead among consumers now is “multi-masking”. But is this really a trend or more of a movement? In the past, the landscape of skin care masques have always been mysterious to consumers. Until now. Consumers have moved from the lack of comprehension of masks to a clearer understanding.

    multi mask imageThis could not have been achieved without the support of professional skin therapists worldwide. For years, skin therapists have understood that one size never fits all! In fact, there are no two skins alike. Skin conditions constantly change. And with these constant changes that the average person goes through, as a result of the weather, diet, hormones, lifestyle choices and stress, multi-masking just makes sense. Masking still is, today, the quickest way to achieve visible results in the skin’s tone, oil presence, hydration/radiance levels and inflammatory levels.

    Often at times, all of these concerns can show up at once! And if one size does not fit all, multi-masking can support in a brilliant way. Any of these concerns can be addressed in just 7-10 minutes with masks – day or night, just a few times a week. The key to making the most of multi-masking is to not combine the ingredients in one area or zone – but to multi-mask the face zone by zone as the conditions dictate.

    Here are some recommendations you can give to your clients:

    For oily skin, recommend a clay based mask to absorb excess oil. This is a concern, commonly found in the T-zone of the face. Oil balancing ingredients include Activated Charcoal, as well as Bentonite and Kaolin clays.

    For dehydrated, dull or sensitive skin, a hydrating and calming mask will calm and lock in moisture levels. These concerns can be prevalent in the cheek areas, and may sometimes involve the neck and chest. Look for ingredients such as Cross-linked Hyaluronic Acid, Aloe Vera, Chamomile and Avena Sativa (Oat) that are extremely beneficial for optimal moisturization and turn down redness levels.

    For lackluster, hyperpigmented or dull skin, vitamins are a must. This is a common concern in the chest, possibly cheeks and forehead area. Vitamin A, C and E along with key amino acids help to recover the skin’s health and vitality, revealing a brighter and more radiant skin.

    Having a comprehensive understanding of these common issues and simple approach with multi-masking will position you as the go-to skin therapist to remedy many concerns at once. Because great skin always begins with great education.

    So, go ahead and tell your clients to join the multi-masking movement. It’s well overdue!