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  • The Benefits of Pumpkin Ingredients on the Skin

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    Autumn can play some nasty tricks on your skin with its winds and chilly weather. But you can give your skin a treat by using the perfect ingredient of the season, pumpkin, to reveal glowing new skin underneath.

    Pumpkin contains a lot of amazing properties that benefit the skin in many different ways. So how does pumpkin help skin?

    • Pumpkin is packed with fruit enzymes and alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs), which increase cell turnover, to brighten and smooth the skin.

    • Pumpkin contains antioxidant Vitamin A and Vitamin C to help soften and soothe the skin and boost collagen production to prevent the signs of aging.

    • Zinc in pumpkin seeds is brilliant for acne sufferers. Zinc will help control the hormone level and oil production, as well as assist with healing of the skin.

    • Pumpkin seeds are high in essential fatty acids and Vitamin E, which are necessary to maintain good barrier function of the skin. They also regulate sebum, great for an oily skin.

    • The molecular structure of pumpkin is small and therefore can penetrate deeper into the skin when used topically. This is amazing for treating a dull complexion, aging skin and pigmentation.

    Due to the many benefits pumpkin has, clients can adjust their home care routine to include products with this key ingredient. Start with recommending a day moisturizer with SPF, especially if they’re concerned with hyperpigmentation. Look for formulations with unique encapsulation technology that time-releases active ingredients and sunscreens into the skin for enhanced ultraviolet (UV) protection, while inhibiting melanosome activity and providing hydration benefits.

    Pair it up with a night time treatment moisturizer that also contains peptides, antioxidants and plant extracts like Giant White Bird of Paradise Seed and Moth Bean Seed to improve luminosity, strengthen skin and increase cell turnover all while they sleep.

    For the best results this season, it’s simple – target skin with products containing pumpkin!

  • Give Sunscreen a Boost with Plant Oleosomes!

    The plant kingdom once again provides cosmetic chemists with a new technology that plays an important role in sunscreen formulations. Known as oleosomes, these oil capsules are found naturally in various plants and seeds, providing a reservoir for plant oils that provide an energy source for the plant. Cosmetic scientists have learned that these spherical structures can be loaded with active substances such as sunscreens, providing both a means of delivery, as well as, a stabilized environment for actives that may break down under normal conditions. Oleosomes represent the next generation in encapsulation.

    They also act as natural emulsifying agents, allowing us to reduce the amount of emulsifier used in a formula. Why is this important? Because we now know that emulsifying agents can interfere with chemical sunscreen activity, especially when higher SPFs are used. When oleosomes loaded with active sunscreens are added to a formula, less of the regular emulsifying agents are required. The end result is that we get a boost to SPF activity with a lower concentration of sunscreen actives and emulsifiers. This is a real bonus, especially for individuals that may find higher concentrations of chemical sunscreens potentially irritating. When applied to the skin, oleosomes collapse in a timed-release fashion, delivering the sunscreen protection over a period of time. Not since the development of UV Smart Booster technology, which delivered antioxidant capsules to provide enhanced sunscreen protection, has there been such exciting new technology that promises to change the development of sunscreen products.

  • What Exactly is a Sunburn?

     

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    How many of you have ever experienced a sunburn? I’m guessing that almost all of us have, with an embarrassing blush! Yes, we know it’s wrong and we kick ourselves when we are wincing with pain as we try to dress. But maybe if we truly understood what is happening to our skins as we nonchalantly lay in the sun for that extra 10 minutes, we wouldn’t be so lax.

    What is a Sunburn?

    A sunburn is the skin’s response to extreme ultraviolet (UV) exposure and indicates severe damage. In as little as 10 minutes of intense UV exposure, the skin sets into motion a system of defense against this enemy. The first indication of damage is redness. This is the body’s inflammatory response in situations requiring repair and is a result of dilating blood vessels. The skin will then start to lose moisture and hydration, which will be apparent with a feeling of tightness. Slowly, skin cells will start to thicken and melanin pigment will be produced (tanning) in an attempt to stop the UV rays from penetrating through to the deeper layers and damaging the DNA of the cells. When the skin is exposed to high levels of sunlight this may result in hypo or hyperpigmentation which appears as irregular light or dark patches. The body is excellent at coping with minimal amounts of damage, but if exposure is greater than the body’s ability to repair and mop up, more serious consequences may result. If DNA is damaged and its repair mechanisms are inhibited, skin cancer may occur.

    Why Does the Skin Peel?

    Peeling after a sunburn is your body’s way of getting rid of the damaged cells that are at risk of “losing control” and becoming cancerous. Due to this danger, all damaged cells are instructed to self destruct by repair mechanisms within these cells. This mass destruction of cells results in whole layers of damaged skin peeling off, to be replaced by other cells underneath those layers.

    I Have a Sunburn, What Should I Do Now?

    First of all, you should take care of the cause of your problem: get out of the sun immediately. Drink plenty of water as you may be dehydrated. If skin is severely blistered, seek help from a medical practitioner. Otherwise it is important to take down the inflammation and try to reduce damage to the deeper layers of your skin.

    Take a cool bath (no products added) and then blot skin dry. Avoid greasy creams, which prevent the skin from cooling and may make the situation worse. Rather, apply generously a soothing after-sun gel to red areas and then stay out of the sun and the heat. Look for ingredients such as Clove, Licorice, Lavender, Cucumber and Yucca to reduce irritation, pain and redness. Also look out for an incredible ingredient called Japanese Alder to accelerate the repair of UV induced DNA damage. Couple this with ingredients such as Algae and Hyaluronic Acid to rehydrate the skin and you should be well on your way to a calmer skin.

    And no, it is not then ok to go out into the sun the next day for another blast! Remember, your skin is still trying to heal and so must be kept out of direct sunlight for a good few days. Keep in mind, the skin is a great record keeper and even with a great after-sun product, irreparable damage may have occurred in the form of premature aging or skin cancer that may only reveal itself later. Think twice next time you decide “just another ten minutes;” your immune system is listening!

  • Sunscreen: Facts, Tips, Tricks

    Annet KingHere in the west, we’re entering into summer, and you know what that means: fun in the sun – and more exposed skin in need of extra sun protection! But even for those entering into winter, protection from ultraviolet (UV) rays is still just as necessary! We skin therapists know this, but do your clients? Here are some easy tips to share with them for keeping skin protected from those ever harmful UV rays:

    Protect and Apply Sunscreen Liberally.
    It’s not enough to just apply sunscreen, make sure enough sunscreen is actually used, whether in direct sunlight or not. Studies indicate that most people do not apply nearly as much daylight protection as they should. A teaspoon for the face and a shot glass for the body are needed, and re-apply every 2hrs. It is best to stay out of the midday sun (from mid-morning to late afternoon) whenever you can. Wear long sleeves and long pants of tightly woven fabrics, a hat with a wide brim, and sunglasses that absorb UV. Thanks to today’s sophisticated formulas and technology, you can select your sunscreen according to your skin condition or your lifestyle. Choose exactly what the skin needs, from oil free, matted formulas for oily skin, chemical free sunblock for sensitive skin, easy, waterproof sprays or protective wipes for the kids or a light booster with SPF to add to your favorite moisturizer.


    Soothe Over Exposed Skin
    Let’s face it: you forgot the sunscreen, didn’t apply enough or got caught in a hot sunny spell. The damage is done but today we have access to super soothing botanicals and cooling after sun gels that help repair DNA damage, prevent peeling, reduce redness and heal inflammation. Apply generously over exposed skin at the first sight of a pink glow. And remember for next time- one blistering sunburn doubles your risk of melanoma, so be sure to get a yearly skin exam by a doctor and perform a self-examination once a month to detect early warning signs of carcinomas and malignant melanoma. Look for a new growth or any skin change.

    Repair and Treat Sun Damage
    UV light causes photoaging in the form of brown spots, coarse skin and wrinkles whether you have burned your skin or not. When sunlight comes in contact with skin, a cascade of damage results, such as the stripping of barrier lipids (causing inflammation), the production of reactive oxygen molecules (which affect healthy cell growth), the stimulation of collagen destructing enzymes, the list goes on and on. So that tan may look pretty, but it indicates damage. Step up your regimen and bombard your skin with age fighting products and ingredients to help undo any damage that may occur to further protect it from the aging effects of Ultraviolet (UV) radiation.