News

  • Getting the Most out of Vitamins

    In the past decade, scientific studies have supported the use of topically applied vitamins in skin care products. At The International Dermal Institute, we have been researching how we can optimize the delivery of these actives into the skin. Knowing that liposomes, liquid filled bubbles made from layered phospholipids, could be filled with vitamins and used as a delivery vehicle, we wanted to see if we could maximize the use of this technology. Our research revealed that while liposomes provide enhanced delivery of actives into the skin, they do have a few limitations- one of which is the amount of vitamins that can be loaded inside.

    So you can imagine how excited we were when we found a more advanced liposomal structure that is the result of high pressure homogenization; this new, smaller type of structure enables a higher amount of actives to be loaded into the bubble and represents the next generation in liposome technology. When liposomes come in contact with our skin, the phospholipids, being very similar to the skin’s natural membrane lipids, allow the liposome to fuse with our skin’s membrane, delivering its contents. In the case of these newer liposomes, more actives can be delivered. We have found that they work very well with Retinyl Palmitate, (a derivative of Vitamin A), Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E) and Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate (a stable derivative of vitamin C).

    When comparing these encapsulated vitamins vs. their non-encapsulated counterparts, studies have shown higher effectiveness with the encapsulated forms. For example, studies comparing collagen stimulation when an empty liposome is used, vs. free Magnesium Ascorbyl Phosphate (MAP) and encapsulated MAP, show that MAP stimulates collagen almost three times more than empty liposomes; however, encapsulated MAP was over 25 times more effective than the empty liposome.

    This advanced form of technology enables cosmetic chemists to maximize the amount of actives delivered to the targeted site to optimize skin health. Look for more of these new advances over the coming years!

  • The Benefits of Pumpkin Ingredients on the Skin

    Pumpkin2

    Autumn can play some nasty tricks on your skin with its winds and chilly weather. But you can give your skin a treat by using the perfect ingredient of the season, pumpkin, to reveal glowing new skin underneath.

    Pumpkin contains a lot of amazing properties that benefit the skin in many different ways. So how does pumpkin help skin?

    • Pumpkin is packed with fruit enzymes and alpha hydroxy acids (AHAs), which increase cell turnover, to brighten and smooth the skin.

    • Pumpkin contains antioxidant Vitamin A and Vitamin C to help soften and soothe the skin and boost collagen production to prevent the signs of aging.

    • Zinc in pumpkin seeds is brilliant for acne sufferers. Zinc will help control the hormone level and oil production, as well as assist with healing of the skin.

    • Pumpkin seeds are high in essential fatty acids and Vitamin E, which are necessary to maintain good barrier function of the skin. They also regulate sebum, great for an oily skin.

    • The molecular structure of pumpkin is small and therefore can penetrate deeper into the skin when used topically. This is amazing for treating a dull complexion, aging skin and pigmentation.

    Due to the many benefits pumpkin has, clients can adjust their home care routine to include products with this key ingredient. Start with recommending a day moisturizer with SPF, especially if they’re concerned with hyperpigmentation. Look for formulations with unique encapsulation technology that time-releases active ingredients and sunscreens into the skin for enhanced ultraviolet (UV) protection, while inhibiting melanosome activity and providing hydration benefits.

    Pair it up with a night time treatment moisturizer that also contains peptides, antioxidants and plant extracts like Giant White Bird of Paradise Seed and Moth Bean Seed to improve luminosity, strengthen skin and increase cell turnover all while they sleep.

    For the best results this season, it’s simple – target skin with products containing pumpkin!

  • Sunscreen and Expiration Dates Explained

    Taking sunbath

    One of the most critical products that I would advocate a client use before any other type of skin care product would be a sunscreen. We know that Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is responsible for a number of skin concerns ranging from various forms of hyperpigmentation to more serious precancerous and cancerous lesions. We also know that approximately 80-99% of extrinsic aging comes from exposure to UVR! For this reason, The International Dermal Institute recommends using sunscreen every day, not just during the summer months.

    The FDA requires that all sunscreens retain their original strength for at least 2-3 years, and in order to make these claims the sunscreen formula has to undergo a series of real time or accelerated stability tests to prove that the ingredient is still active up until the time of expiration. It’s important to point out at this point that if you’re using sunscreen every day and in the correct amount, a tube should not last that long. Most clients don’t realize that their sunscreen has a limited time in which it can be used effectively, so it may be a good idea to point out the expiration date to the client when they purchase their next sunscreen product from you. Most expiration dates can be found stamped on the crimp of the product packaging tube or printed on the bottom of the product carton.

    If sunscreens have expired there is a good chance they are still good for a few months; however once you reach the expiration date there is no guarantee that the level of activity is still present. You may also want to point out a few of these basic but important tips to your clients next time they inquire about purchasing their sunscreen from you:

    • The best place to store your SPF product is in a cool place out of direct sunlight and heat.

    • Buy smaller sizes of your SPF product vs. larger “30% extra for free” products, which will inevitably expire before you get a chance to use them all and you’ll end up having to throw them out.

    • Don’t use any SPF formulation that contains fragrance or perfume as this may cause hyperpigmentation and, in some cases, a photosensitized reaction on the skin.

    • If your client has a more sensitive skin, she or he would be better off using a physical SPF (containing Titanium Dioxide and Zinc Oxide), as these formulations tend to have a larger molecular size that does not penetrate and potentially cause irritation.

    • Try to look for a formulation that can potentially deliver additional skin health benefits, such as Vitamin E and Vitamin C to the skin, as these types of sunscreens help to minimize the amount of free radical damage to the skin, thereby offering a more advanced level of protection.

    • Many clients are hesitant to use sunscreen because they feel the formulations are too thick, heavy or pore clogging. Professional products, however, use new technology that delivers more sophisticated SPFs, which have the ability to benefit different skin types and conditions. This allows you to prescribe a sunscreen that’s perfectly customized to your clients’ needs.